Fire Spinning Fuel Review – White Gas (Camp Fuel) vs Kerosene!

Fire Spinning Fuel – Review and Comparison

Recently we created a video tutorial on the Sacred Flow Art YouTube channel on the fire spinning fuel types of white gasoline (camp fuel) vs kerosene, to witness and talk about their primary differences and commonalities. Let’s cover what was covered that day on Punta Jesús María, on Ometepe Island, in Nicaragua.

Our Fire Spinning Fuel Experience 

From my first burn and until about a year ago, 95% of the time, my fuel of choice was white gasoline (the other 5% of the time it simply wasn’t available). The notorious “Coleman’s Camp Fuel” (now also popular is the brand “Crown”, as we used in our First Fire Spin tutorial is what I was introduced to as it was the choice of the majority of fire spinners I met, it was easy to acquire and cheap, and in comparison the smell was much less intrusive to my senses than the other fuels I had experienced. It wasn’t until Latin America that I had to source out and find something different because white gasoline was very uncommon or unheard of.

During our drive around the world tour, much to my chagrin, Mexico had acquired “gasolina blanca” that we could acquire at any “Comex” store (a very common paint store). Though after Mexico, no more of our favorite fuel was to be found (thus far; perhaps Costa Rica will have it), so it had to be the much more popular and widely used kerosene. Recently, I am growing quite fond of the blue to beige fuel for a few reasons:

Fire Spinning with White Gas vs Kerosene 

In summary, fire spinning white gas vs kerosene has it’s differences! Unless you need a quick light up, or cannot stand the smell, Kerosene wins the fire fuel match. Simply for its overall ease in acquiring and its 40% longer burn time. White gasoline burns bright, fast, but is quickly dimming within a minute or so of burning. Kerosene takes a few seconds to get hot enough to stay lit. And will stay brighter longer and really only begin to really fade after 30-60 seconds. Kerosene also does not evaporate like white gasoline does, so time isn’t as much of a time constituent to light up before the wicks are dry and need a re-dip.

And this wasn’t included in the video, but the price comparison is about the same. Maybe a little less for kerosene depending on the source. But for the most part, we have found we pay for a gallon of kerosene for about the same price as a gallon of white gas (about $8-9).

Happy burning! Stay safe with a safety, fire blanket or wet towel, fire extinguisher, and far away from anything flammable.

Yours in flow,

Jesse Hart of Full Circle Phenomenal
A Sacred Flow Art Community Blogger

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